Wednesday, 2 July 2008

Marigolds, Nasturtiums and Feverfew

What a bugger computers are! It has been on a go-slow and sulk all day. It refused to download the piccies I had just taken of my garden. With the aid of headphones, Skype and a certain amount of emotional blackmail, I persuaded Jemima to talk me through how to get into the bowels of the computer and sort out the problem. Phew. Done it.

Here are some flowers that have appeared in my garden. I love these semi-wild flowers that seed themselves promiscuosly each year.


Nasturtiums. They are so bright and cheerful and are scattered about the garden with gay abandon. I also have various hues of yellow but this, my very favourite:


It's a sort of maroon colour and certainly I shall try to save some seed and hope it will come true to colour next year.


Feverfew. This makes brilliant cut flowers that last for ages, especially if mixed with:


Lady's Mantle. I love the leaves on this plant. When it has rained, the drops cling to the leaves like jewels.


Marigolds. One of my favourite flowers. When I was at school I used to tell everyone my middle-name was Marigold. I even told a couple of boyfriends that was my first-name.


Welsh Poppies. These get everywhere.


Creeping Jenny. These creep everywhere.

This year I have been meticulous in dead-heading the fading flowers. Every morning and evening I prowl round the garden with my scissors and snip happily away. Because of this they have been flowering for weeks on end and I can see more and more flower buds developing.

And this is my latest garden ornament:


A water butt. When I was staying with Jenny recently I was so impressed with her butt (!) I went to B&Q as soon as I got home and got one for myself. Thanks Jenny!

34 comments:

Maalie said...

Such a nice post, I trust nobody will cast nasturtiums upon it.

Very colourful.

Elizabeth said...

My husband's uncle called flowers that self-seed "volunteers"
these are the best kind of flowers.....they want to be there
your nasturtiums rule!

NaNcY said...

wonderful photos...glad you got them up!

Jemima-Jempp said...

Didn´t take any pictures of the hyperboles though. What a shame. xxx

The Lone Beader said...

Beautiful flowers!

Anonymous said...

Ah...there's nothing like seeding yourself promiscuously!

Jack

lorenzothellama said...

Jemima: shame there were no forget-me-nots left for me to photo for you! These really are promiscuous plants! They even outdo the nasturtiums in their randyness!

Maria said...

Wonderful flowers! Beautiul! The colors - hm!

Merisi said...

You are lucky that more than nasty weeds are volunteering in your garden (and then again, you are probably the kind of gardener who needs nothing more than a stern look, for weeds to pack up their roots, and ship out! *g*).

I like the taste of nasturtium leaves in salads.

lorenzothellama said...

Quite right Merisi. I chat away happily to my plants and when they are what Maalie would call runcible, I threaten them with the compost heap. They soon come into line then.

Ted M. Gossard said...

Beautiful flowers. The older I get the more I like them. My mother used to plant flowers galore at our place growing up; actually I think there are more flowers there with her than ever! Keeps her young at 81, keeping them watered, I guess, in her big yard in the country.

Yes, marigolds are beauties to be sure. I don't even know what flowers are my favorite anymore. I do love tulips, our tulip festival in Holland, Michigan near us is really nice. And I think they make tulip beer for that as well! Haven't tried it, yet.

Martin Stickland said...

HAPPY 4th of July to you me old fruit!

Oh no, I forgot, you is one of us and not one of them over the pond!

Hope you are fine and dandy and what time do we turn up for Sunday lunch?

Ex-Shammickite said...

I had some of those maroony rust nasties too, and it was GORGEOUS, I saved some seeds and they have grown but no flowers yet, probably cos they are in a shady place. I've put nasturtium petals in salads, it looks super! I've got Ladys Mantle too in the garden, I love it! Your marigolds are different to what is commonly known as marigold here in NA.

Halfmom, AKA, Susan said...

I do wish that I could have seen the skype scene! I bet that would have been funny indeed. However, I cannot, for the life of me, get the pictures to go about where i want them - they just seem to appear and the preview screen is of no help since it doesn't resemble the final product at all!! Perhaps I shall "skype" you! That would be fun.

Happy independence day yourself! I spent part of the morning on email with a British colleague and he said he would forgive me my rebellion and ignorance. Am in hopes that you will do the same.

Thesaurus Rex said...

hhmmm, perhaps the big daisies at the back of my garden are feverfew. Or just big daisies. Been taking lotsa pics of the flaahz in me garden too. Will post one day when I'm feeling like a gardener. Not much point growing them if they just become memory alone.

sonia a.m. said...

What a beautiful garden! Your flowers looks gorgeous!

Thanks for your nice visiting on my blog!

Plumpy said...

That looks like a wonderful garden for lazing in the sun, and even better flowers for lazing in the shade!

Mum and I are wondering if you and Whitby's mum will put pictures of him up on my fan page on Facebook?

Raelha said...

I love those nasturtiums, especially that very colour. Unfortunately all the ones in my garden seem to revert to yellow if I let them self-seed.

And I'm jealous of your butt. You can't buy them here. I have one made from an old industrial container, cleaned and with a tap fixed on.

Sorry to have been away for so long. I'll write more soon, and hopefully get the blog up and running again.

lorenzothellama said...

Raelha, how lovely to hear from you! Glad you like my butt!

Elbi, Plumpy and Scaredy have been a'chattin' over at Plumpy's don't you know!

Did you enjoy Wimbledon?

The Lone Beader said...

Hi Lorenzo! THanks for stoppin by! Yes, the DeLorean has gull wing doors. Wicked cool! :D

Barbara said...

After your kind comments on my post I was hoping that you would have some of your garden posted when I came over.

Ted M. Gossard said...

Hey, Lorenzo,
If and when you have the chance, come to my blog and check out our new addition to our family!

simon said...

our trees and flowers are in bud already!! seems early to me!

CurlyfrySC's Collage said...

I have sand in my yard (from living near the ocean) and I've tried and tried to grow flowers. Nothing lasts long enough for me.

Argh!

tut-tut said...

Our local garden group gave a talk on how to set up a rain barrel (water butt), but I did not attend it.

We had an unusual volunteer this year: a tiny tomato plant appeared next to a rose bush. D transplanted both, and now the tomato is about three feet high, covered in blossoms and tiny green tomatoes. The rose is much happier, too, in its new setting.

Martin Stickland said...

Why you green fingered little thing you!

Off to bed now .... snore

Goodnight!

madretz said...

About 10 years ago, I was hiking...ok, walking...on a trail by the Golden Gate Bridge with a friend. We stumbled upon a patch of beautiful orange flowers and I squealed delightfully but didn't know what they were. My wiccan friend, of course knew that they were nasturtiums. Their colors are so vibrant.

Merisi said...

@ PLUMPY:
Thanks to the New York Times, I came across a quote from Darwin's "On the Origins of Species" which I thought may warm your heart:

"The number of humble-bees in any district depends in a great degree on the number of field-mice, which destroy their combs and nests; and Mr. H. Newman, who has long attended to the habits of humble-bees, believes that “more than two thirds of them are thus destroyed all over England.” Now the number of mice is largely dependent, as every one knows, on the number of cats; and Mr. Newman says, “Near villages and small towns I have found the nests of humble-bees more numerous than elsewhere, which I attribute to the number of cats that destroy the mice.” Hence it is quite credible that the presence of a feline animal in large numbers in a district might determine, through the intervention first of mice and then of bees, the frequency of certain flowers in that district!° (Charles Darwin, “On the Origin of Species”, first edition, chapter 3, page 74 of the Harvard University Press facsimile edition)

lorenzothellama said...

Ooo Merisi!! Thanks for that. I'll quote that at Maalie Man and BadMaxSimon. They are always making rude comments about cats and seem to think that they should be exterminated en masse!

Maalie said...

Yes it is fascinating how these ecological webs intertwine.

Unfortunately the cats also tend to kill a lot of birds as well and when there are other environmental stresses in operation (chemicals; agricultural practices, etc.) the balance is easily disrupted.

Isadora said...

Lovely garden and I too love the nasturtiums!! mine ended up covered with bugs after the blooming was about through and the leaves are eaten.

Martin Stickland said...

Aaaaaaah you are such a likkle likkle cutie pie with your kind comments.

In fact that if you had been sharing the boat with my true love then I would have only eaten half of you (which part do you want left, top or bottom?)

:)

Ex-Shammickite said...

Lorenzo... regarding secrecy at Bletchley Park, we were told that a very recent visitor to the museum was looking at some displays showing WW2 pictures of the WRENs operating the decoding machines, and recognised her mother.... and her mother had never disclosed to anyone at all what she used to do in the war.
Very interesting place.
And it has a nice restaurant for lunch too!

Craver Vii said...

Water butts... that's funny. I like the idea of using rain barrels, though I haven't seen any in our local stores. I understand that some people do kits that we can build ourselves.